• 29

    Mar

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/Panhandlers

I grew up in a home with seven siblings (including me). While growing up I remember there was always an uncle, aunt, cousin or family friend living with us. My parents were both generous, proud and loving individuals. They cherished helping others. I was about 11 years old when one day I asked my mother “why was there always someone living with us even though she had seven children?” My mother responded, “son, your father and I see it as our duty to help others. You have two hands, one to ‘give’ and the other to ‘receive’.” To date, I have lived my life with my mother’s principle indelibly memorized in my brain; I cherish helping others.
Then, why am I having angst about giving money to individuals begging on street corners and outside business establishments?  I believe that 95% of the individuals with signs on streets corners begging for money are panhandlers. I also surmise that there is a difference between panhandlers and homeless individuals. The panhandlers seemed to stake out their turf where everyday at certain times they can engage their marks for money. I have heard of stories where some of these individuals (panhandlers) have cars parked blocks away where they change clothes after a day “at work begging.”

 

Most homeless individuals seemed to be very proud and rarely approach anyone asking for money. They know that there are several charitable organizations and homeless shelters available where they can get help. Panhandlers on the other hand – no pun intended – are all about obtaining money. In some areas, panhandlers can be seen on all four corners of  busy intersections displaying their signs begging for money. In my opinion, it seems they have coordinated a plan to sponge off of us.  I am not a scrooge, but I am one who has little tolerance for bad behavior.

I believe that those of us who are compelled to give panhandlers money, should pause and consider giving those funds to a reputable charitable organization or homeless shelter. These organizations – they are many – will accept your donation; no amount is too small.

  • 22

    Mar

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/Wash Your Hands


I have noticed that many upscale hotels, restaurants, public buildings and bars are placing waste paper containers inside the entrance/exit door of their Men Restroom. I applaud their action, because too many men use the men’s restroom urinals and toilets and leave the restrooms without washing their hands. I believe every man reading this blog have seen such a culprit. Those of us who wash our hands after using urinals and toilets, usually wipe our hands with the napkins provided. We then use the napkins to touch the handle of the restroom’s door before exiting, because we are not comfortable touching a door handle after someone who did not wash their hands. So, it is not unusual to see several pieces of used napkins on the floor of the inside door of Men’s Restroom, because some of us throw the napkin there upon exiting the restroom. One bad behavior begets another. 

This could be avoided if every man just “wash their hands” after using urinals and toilets. What kind of conduct are we exhibiting when our behavior creates a health risk for someone else? Bad unsavory behavior, that’s what! No wonder Donald Trump doesn’t like to shake hands, especially with individuals he doesn’t know. I am almost tempted to follow Trump’s lead on hand shaking.

It’s enlightening and welcoming to see that some public establishments have recognized the need for an extra trash bin in the men’s restroom.  Guys, please “wash your hands” after using urinals and toilets; it would put the rest of us at ease and IT IS COMMON SENSE.

  • 15

    Mar

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/Japan Earthquake

The aftermath of the massive 9.0 earthquake in Japan has left many of the citizens, who were living close to the epicenter, homeless, without food, water (in some cases) and many are mourning the death of family members. The Tsunami that engulfed many of the coastline cities near the epicenter has created a humanitarian, economic and potential nuclear crisis. I spoke with a friend yesterday who lives in Tokyo, Japan. He remarked that over the last several days, he has been afraid and he is sleeping with his shoes and clothes on just in case he suddenly has to run out of his apartment. The largest earthquake in Japan’s history has generated many aftershocks, which have created a high level of nervousnes and uncertainty among the citizens.
Yet, in spite of the current threat of a nuclear meltdown, no place to live, shortage of food, water and no power in several areas of the country the Japanese citizens remain calm, orderly, optimistic, helpful and respectful to one another.

Almost six years ago during the Hurricane Katrina disaster on the United States of America’s Gulf Coast, we witnessed quite a different scenario. Even though “most” of the Gulf Coast citizens behaved mannerly, there were many citizens who engaged in looting (some police officers included), burglary, violence and in some cases uncivilized behavior.  Why did two almost similiar natural disasters produced different behavior from some of the citizens affected? The answer might be “Culture.”

The citizens’ behavior “currently” being exhibited in Japan depicts a society that is largely based on order and respect for one another. Here in America, we can learn from the Japanese that good behavior protects, respects and aids everyone, especially, in a chaotic crisis.

 

  • 08

    Mar

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior: Gumshoes

If you have similiar movie viewing taste like me and enjoy the old Black and White Detective Movies starring such legendary iconic movie stars as Humphrey Bogart and Robert Mitchum, then you know who a “gumshoe” is. The Word Detective defines a “gumshoe” as the original “gumshoes” of the late 1800’s were shoes or boots made of gum rubber, the soft-soled precursors of our modern sneakers… At the turn of the century “to gumshoe” meant to sneak around quietly as if wearing gumshoes, either in order to rob or, conversely, to catch thieves. “Gumshoe man” was originally slang for a thief, but by about 1908 “gumshoe” usually meant a police detective, as it has ever since.
The Bogart and Mitchum characters were famously known for walking and searching every cubbyhole to find their suspects.  This behavior suggests that the name originated from the gum-rubber soles on the shoes worn by detectives and private investigators. The rubber soles allowed the investigator to move quietly and avoid detection.

Today, at least in my mind, we are all “gumshoes.” We all have – at one time or another – had a piece of throw away chewing gum stuck to our shoes. Trying to remove gum from our shoes can be a tedious and undesirable task.

Recently, I have been observing, mostly in places where pedestrians traverse, hundreds of tiny black spots that are plastered on sidewalks and pavements. Upon further examination, I discerned that these black spots are chewing gums that were crushed to the pavements by someone’s shoes. How did the chewing get from someone’s mouth to the pavement, I asked myself. Duh..the person chewing the gum must have spit it out of their mouth onto the pavement.

I rarely chew gum and when I do I am very conscientious about placing it in a trash receptacle after I have finished masticating it. My hope is that individuals who chew gum will curb their bad behavior and stop spitting gum onto pavements and sidewaks. This behavior is not only disgusting, but it is utterly inconsiderate.

Today, I believe  “gumshoe” has taken on a different meaning since we all may have had to – at one time or another – remove chewing gum from our shoes. Please, let’s curb our bad behavior and discard our chewing gum into trash receptacles: we will help preserve other pedestrians’ shoe soles.

  • 03

    Mar

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior

Parents who have teenage childred should advise them to stop speeding and pay attention while driving their automobiles. Last Sunday, I lost my beloved nephew; he was killed in a car crash in Brooklyn, New York. This young man, Devon Burgess, 19 years old, had ambitous dreams. He was going to attend Berkeley University next semester and realized his dream of becoming an engineer. You can imagine how proud I was of his achievement to attend one of the premier universities in the country. Finally, I was going to have a blood relative on the West Coast (California) with me. Thanksgivings and Christmas was going to be memorable while I bond with him. It was not to be.
The headline in one New York newspaper read “Speed Kills Man.” Devon was the front seat passenger in a Chrysler Sebring which slammed into a utility pole killing him. The driver, 19 years old, is hospitalized with internal injuries. The two young women who were sitting in the rear are also severly injured. One of them may need cosmetic surgery, the other has broken bones and was on a respirator. My family is very sad and prayful with Devon’s passing: he was our “shinning star.”

Devon’s passing gave me the push to write this blog. I have been pondering scribing this blog for a while. After his death at such a young age, I realize that life waits on no one. So, I immediately took action and wrote the first blog. He will forever be remembered – by our family – as an intelligent, kind, hardworking, humble and Christian young man.

The statics of teenagers dying from automobile accidents are way too many. There is a reason why the insurance cost for teenage drivers is very expensive; they, teenagers, incure too many accidents. It is imperative that we save our teenage children by helping them curb their bad behavior. They must slow down and pay attention, no texting or watching TV, while operating a motor vehicle. We have to inform them that motor vehicles can be “weapons” and weapons kill. If we are allowing our children to drive cars, the same attention that we gave to buying the vehicle must also be present in sharing with them the responsibility of owning and operating an automobile.

Parents, please advise your teenagers to slow down while driving automobiles. And, we adults should heed to the advice we intimate to our children.