• 31

    May

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By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/Thank You

When I first started writing the “Curbing Bad Behavior” (CBB) Blog, I had no idea how it would be received. After more than three months of publishing CBB, I am grateful for the support it has received. While navigating through our daily lives, it seems like the words “please,” “excuse me,” “how can I help you?” and “thank you” are disappearing from our vocabulary, I would like to say THANK YOU to everyone who has supported my blog.
“Curbing Bad Behavior” supporters have been gracious, informative and helpful.  Your responses to my weekly posts, your phone calls, your suggestions on topics I should pen and your kind remarks I received while I’m out in public conducting my daily activities have been a motivating force which has encouraged me to continue writing “Curbing Bad Behavior.”  There is one person whose name I’ll list; she has given my blog, CBB, a larger audience. Thank you Susan Henderson, publisher/editor of the Mountain Views News, for including my blog in your newspapers.

You ladies and gentlemen are the best! You have demonstrated that in our world which can sometimes overwhelm us with strife, you took the time to support and encourage me. I am truly blessed by your gratitude.

As I continue to write about topics that are interesting to me and hopefully to you, I will remember that without your kindness and support, “Curbing Bad Behavior” would not exist. Again, I say thank you for the encouragement, love and support.

  • 24

    May

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/The Elephant In The Room

The famous French poet, statesman and human rights activist Victor-Marie Hugo said “There is nothing as powerful as an idea whose time has come.” Prepare yourselves my fellow Southern Californians, we will soon have to change our behavior to embrace a mass transit system. Considered the capital of American car culture, Southern California is well known for motorists who love their automobiles. The shift in behavior from independent private mobility to public mass transit will not be easy.
We, Southern Californians, live in the most populated state in America.  Since there is no “extensive” mass transit system available in Southern California, it is understandable why millions of us drive our automobiles to and from our daily activities. We endure the negative effects of traffic, angry motorists and carbon emissions while pondering when will a paradigm shift – in terms of our mobility – occur from the use of our iconic automobiles to a much needed mass transit system.

Recently, I had the enviable task of driving southbound on Southern California 405 Freeway. After driving about five minutes in bumper to bumper traffic (5 miles per hour), I decided to move over into the car pool lane, since my friend Bobby Holland was riding in the car with me. Once in the car pool lane, we drove non stop at about 50 miles per hour passing over 500 cars. I remembered observing that 99.5% of the cars we passed had one passenger – the driver. As much as I have driven on California Freeways, it has now become very evident to me that there are too many one passenger cars (mine included) on our highways. Something has to be done since California is a sprawling state connected by many freeways and no new highways are being built.

Even though some community outreach campaigns are taking place regarding mass transit future in California, much more has to be done to reduce the appetite we have for driving our one passenger automobiles. The Transportation Officials, who are promoting the benefits of shifting to a mass transit system, must do a better job connecting with the masses of motorists who are reluctant to use public transportation.

In the meanwhile, the elephant remains in the room and it is growing larger.

  • 17

    May

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/The Silly Season

The 2011/2012 rendition of “The Silly Season” has officially began. This is the period in American life when politics become very rancorous. Tighten your seat belts, because it’s going to be a bumpy, mean-spirited and unforgettable ride for the next year and a half.
My late grandmother scolded me by saying “if you don’t want to get mud on you, don’t go to a crab’s dance.” As I listen to the incendiary remarks being spewed by some politicians, I wonder how many of them realize or care that they cannot illuminate themselves by speaking ill of their competitors. In other words, they will get dirty if they are working in an oil field (pun intended).

Is this kind of behavior suitable for our children and the rest of us who are listening and watching?

I am amazed how some politicians pontificate (even lie) to specific audiences repeatedly believing that their diatribe will find agreeable listeners. The fact is in this era of “real time media” every remark can be checked instantly for its validity. So politicians attempting to misguide their audience should find the undertaking a difficult and foolish act.  In my opinion, the vicious and hypocritical vitriol that is hurled from one politician to the other borders on insanity.

Nevertheless, “The Silly Season” has officially began.

  • 10

    May

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/When Respectable Becomes Despicable

I am convinced that in this era of 24 hours news cycle, Facebook, Twitter, Live-Streaming, Google, Bing, Technorati, I-Phones, Blackberry and many others, one’s public  image can be destroyed in a nano minute. An example of such a phenomenon is depicted by the recent despicable behavior of several players of the Los Angeles Lakers Basketball Team. Within minutes of the players’ unsportsmanlike conduct and the Lakers’ humiliating loss to the Dallas Mavericks, who swept them out of the playoffs and ended their run for a third straight championship, the media and fans were clamoring for the exit of the players who had sullied the Los Angeles Lakers Organization image.
Though I do not condone Ron Artest, Lamar Odom and Andrew Bynum’s bad behavior what amazed me was the speed at which the public outcry occurred for their ouster from the Lakers. Artest, Odom and Bynum were very key players when the Los Angeles Lakers won the 2010 National Basketball Association (NBA) Championship. What happened since then? Artest has become a media favorite (his quotes are memorable); Odom has married into the Kardashian family and now has his own Reality TV Show with his wife Khloe; Kobe Bryant and Pau Gasol, the main players on the team, seemed to not be on the same page: there are whispers that they are not even talking to each other; Derek Fisher is one year older and he’s having a tough time keeping pace with the younger point guards in the NBA and Bynum seemed to be frustrated with all the locker room upheaval currently taking place.

The Los Angeles Lakers are basketball royalty. With the exception of the Boston Celtics and New York Knicks, there is no other basketball franchise with the storied history of the Lakers. Also, in terms of championships, only the Boston Celtics has won more than the Los Angeles Lakers. These two teams are the most highly respected in the NBA. I believe it is the duty of the players and their management team (if they do have one) to know that their behavior – both on and off the basketball court – should not contribute to tarnishing the image of the organizations they represent. Is anyone coaching these young men about their responsibilities as ambassadors of the NBA, themselves and the franchises they represent? Who is responsible for what will happen for them after their basketball careers are over?

The unfortunate fact about despicable behavior in sports and in all walks of life is it’s sometimes very difficult to curb.

  • 03

    May

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/ Vigilance

Amid the political chatter and exuberance surrounding the death of terrorist Osama Bin Laden, we (Americans) must be mindful that terrorism has not ended because its leader was killed. As I watched thousands of American celebrate the death of Osama Bin Laden, I pondered that somewhere in the world there are individuals, namely terrorists, who hate America and its citizens’ way of life. And, they are planning the next terrorist attack on our country. We must continue to be vigilant.
I am content that some of the families of the September 11, 2001 victims will find some level of closure now that Osama Bin Laden is dead. As we continue to live our day to day lives in America, let’s not forget that we are a forgiving, prayerful, hardworking and ambitious nation. Over the past 10 years, we have had to change our behavior. No longer can we arrived at airports 20 minutes before our flights are scheduled to leave; no longer can we enter federal buildings without walking through metal detectors and more importantly, whenever we are in public places, we have become more vigilant.  As our enemies acts of terrorism have become bolder, we have had to lookout for one another.

Even though I am blessed to be living in a country where free speech for every citizen is embraced with our system of government, I trust Osama Bin Laden’s death will not be politicized by some of the nonsensical chatter currently being promoted by some of television’s talking heads. This is a time for unity. This is a time for contemplation. This is a time for VIGILANCE.