• 30

    Aug

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/Save The Children

Too many individuals who are affected by the Childhood Obesity epidemic are refusing to discuss it.  Thus, the epidemic continues to growth at a feverish pace in American society. Over the past 30 years Childhood Obesity has more than tripled. The spread of obesity among children aged 6 to 11 years increased from 6.5% in 1980 to 19.6% in 2008. In addition, adolescents aged 12 to 19 years increased from 5.0% to 18.1%. If this is not an alarm for a call to action, then I don’t know what else will galvanize us to act on safeguarding our children’s health.
Obesity is the result of caloric imbalance (too few calories expended for the amount of calories consumed) and is mediated by genetic, behavioral and environmental factors. The main factors being Genetics, Perinatal ( obese mothers giving birth, maternal smoking between 28-32 weeks’ gestation), Early Life Factors ( infant birth weight, sleep duration), Diet and Physical Activity. Children stricken with the above factors are mostly likely to be obese. Obese youth are more likely to have risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as high cholesterol or high blood pressure.

The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth study revealed that obese children with decreasing levels of self-esteem demonstrated significantly higher rates of sadness, loneliness, nervousness and are more likely to engage in high-risk behaviors such as smoking or consuming alcohol. As you can discerned, there is nothing but bad news associated with childhood obesity. We must save our children from this epidemic. Everyone can help by encouraging children to eat healthy, nutritious foods and avoid a sedentary lifestyle. Enlist them in sporting activities and monitor the time they sit at home computers or laptops.

The time has come for us to be honest and courageous by arresting the childhood obesity epidemic. Ignoring this mostly curable epidemic is killing our children and adding astronomical costs to families healthcare expenses. We must save our children from a life of lack of self-esteem – the potential result of childhood obesity.

  • 23

    Aug

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/Childhood Obesity

This is the first in a series of blog posts I plan on writing about Childhood Obesity. The epidemic, Childhood Obesity, is hindering the healthy lives of millions of American children. The First Lady, Michelle Obama, has launched a campaign to combat the epidemic. Mrs. Obama hopes one of her legacies will be her work in reducing childhood obesity, an effort she already has begun by planting the White House garden and joining in physical activities with children.

The issue – who decides what our children eat – with its rancor political tone has created a predicament for health officials, because of the powerful corporations and lawmakers who are involved in debating what’s healthy for American children. “Government statistics showed about 32% of children and adolescents are obese or overweight. Almost 20% of children ages 6 to 11 and 18% of those ages 12 to 19 are obese. Such children are at a greater risk for weight-related health problems such as high cholesterol and diabetes, and they have an increased chance of becoming obese adults.”
If we don’t arrest the Childhood Obesity epidemic in America, who is going to become the country’s future soldiers, police officers, construction workers and firemen? These careers require the individuals who are accepted to work in them to be physically fit and healthy. The vigorous campaign must begin with parents preparing healthy meals for their children; encouraging the children to exercise (take a break from sitting at their computers for long hours) and knowing the obesity facts. Elementary and high schools administrators must also do their part to provide more nutritious food in their cafeterias and vending machines.
We must train our children and ourselves to eat healthy. High schools such as Hollywood High School in Los Angeles, California is leading the way by banning all junk foods out of the school’s vending machines. In the meanwhile, the debate for our children’s health continues.

 

  • 16

    Aug

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/The Burr Of Singularity

Legendary businessman David Ogilvy was one of the most famous names in advertising and one of the handful of thinkers (Raymond Rubicam, Leo Burnett, William Bernbach, Ted Bates) who shaped the business after the 1920s. If you are a fan of the Emmy Award TV Show, “Mad Men,” you might have heard his company, Ogilvy and Mather, mentioned in one of the episodes. Mr. Ogilvy coined the phrase “The Burr of Singularity,” which means “the one magic element of a product that differentiates it from everything else on the market.” I recently have become a huge fan of Mr. Ogilvy’s work. So, as I was preparing to write this blog, the idea of singularity flowed through my mind.
Presently, since there is so much clamoring in our society regarding who’s up, who’s down, who’s out, who’s in, when will things be normal again, we are fighting too many wars, this prompted me to asked the readers of “Curbing Bad Behavior:” what is your “Burr of Singularity?” And, how does it affect your relationships at home, work, friendships and your community? I know it’s none of my business, but thought I would ask anyway. Hmmmm.

  • 09

    Aug

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/Enough With The Profanity

As a public relations consultant, I pride myself on knowing a little bit about the concept of image. I attend workshops, read blogs, books, newspapers and magazines, participate on webinars, engage with my colleagues and attend professional development conferences all with the intention of becoming a knowledgeable and skilled public relations practitioner. So this past weekend, when I learned from several high-placed sources that an Academy Award winning actor and his colleague, a popular TV actor, disgraced themselves by using profanity at an awards celebration filled with hundreds of journalists, I asked myself where was their media training? Or are these gentlemen so full of themselves to believe they can address a “certain” audience with a disrespectfully tone? As they were using profane language in the presence of the stunned audience, several tweets, Facebook posts and texts were being shared with hundreds of social media participants. Their bad behavior became a hot topic during the evening’s festivities.
Is it ever appropriate to use profanity? I say no, especially, public figures should refrain from this behavior. Didn’t these gentlemen realized their ill-considered act was going to be reported to millions of individuals over the worldwide web? Where was their public relations representative? Someone should have told these gentlemen they were addressing hundreds of “reporters.” This is so regretful, I can’t even make sense of it. Hopefully, someone had a private conversation with these two talented gentlemen and imparted to them an apology to the prestigious journalists organization is in order. It’s not too late to say, “we’re sorry.”

Here is my tip for the day: please know your audience, it’s the first rule of communications. And, by the way, “Enough with the profanity.” It is not cool.

 

  • 02

    Aug

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/Self-Preservation Society

The current “Debt Ceiling” debate caused me a lot of anguish. I am quite sure it made many Americans angry. Even the politicians who voted “for” or  “against” raising the Debit Ceiling were agitated about casting their votes.
With remarks such as “President Obama should be more engaged in the process,” “John Boehner cannot control his caucus,” “Harry Reid is not telling the truth,” “This is $3 trillion package,” “Will a deal save the United States AAA rating?” “This is one of the most critical times in the 21st century,” “American are anxious,” “The world is watching America,” “Will the USA leave its soldiers high and dry?” “Don’t cut Medicare, Medicaid or Social Security,” “We need to generate revenue,” “We must raise taxes,” “We are leaving our children too much debt,” “We can’t continue to kick the can down the road,” “Jobs, Jobs, Jobs,” “We are cautiously optimistic,” “Rich Americans must contribute to help balance the budget,” “We cannot balance our budget on the backs of middle class and poor Americans,”  “The damage to America’s creditability has already been done,” “Triggers,” “How will the stock market react?” “Targets,” “We are very close to a deal,” “A compelling narrative has been constructed,” “This crisis is appalling,” “We’re down to the wire,” “Principles,”  “Government spends too much money,” “We have to avoid a default,” “There is a financial catastrophe looming over our country,” “Rank and file members (who are these individuals?),” “Framework,” and my favorite “This is sausage making in full view of the American people,” how can you blame anyone for being angry with our politicians in Washington, D.C.

We are a self-preservation society, so I have resolved myself to be patient and allow the politicians to complete their task. Especially, since the debate is not quite finished; the United States of America Congress will be debating the “Debit Ceiling” again in the Fall of 2011. You go figure!