• 28

    Oct

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/Especially When The Rain Is Falling

It rarely rains in Southern California, but when it does there is an increase in traffic accidents on the roadways. While pondering this plight, I decided to examine the list of traffic accidents I was involved in driving in California. To my surprise, three (3) of the four (4) traffic accidents occurred while I was driving in the rain. My unscientific research revealed that when the rain falls in Southern California, the streets become slippery, because oil – leaked from automobiles – has dried on the roadways and once mixed with the rain it creates a sleek  surface. Furthermore, motorists who refuse to drive slower when the rain is falling create a hazardous driving experience for the rest of us.
Frequently, while driving in the rain, I witnessed fellow motorists navigating their vehicles in a careless manner. One can only surmise what are these individuals thinking, because before they reach their destination, the potential for them to be involved in a traffic accident is imminent. My unsolicited advice to motorists in Southern California is “please slow down, especially when the rain is falling.”

As we all know, the stress of being involved in a traffic accident is sometimes avoidable. Most of us have seen the wreckage of accidents on the roadways during the rainy season and felt blessed we were fortunate to avoid such incidents. Traffic accidents are financial burdens and once insurance companies are contacted to coordinate fixing the damaged vehicles, the rate of one’s insurance cost can be increased.  Also, the motorists involved in traffic accidents have to pay deductible fees to have their cars repaired. Some insurance companies even cancel policies if motorists have too many accidents on their driving records.

We, Californians, are in love with our iconic cars. I sometimes have to remind myself how our cars can unintentionally be used as weapons. And, in the rain, where motorists visibility might be impaired, traffic accidents can involve fatalities. My suggestion is drive slower and you will increase the potential of getting to your destination safely, especially when the rain is falling.

  • 18

    Oct

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/I Need An Assignment

“I am tired coming to these events and leaving without an assignment. I need an assignment!” exclaimed the legendary actress Ruby Dee. Her remarks were included as a clip in the HBO documentary, “Sing Your Song,” which chronicles the life of the highly respected singer/actor/civil rights leader Harry Belafonte. Ms. Dee admonished the audience during a forum (organized by Mr. Belafonte) for a selected group of civil rights leaders who were discussing the state of African-Americans in the United States of America. Ms. Dee’s remarks caused me to ponder “what is my assignment, today?”
During these challenging economic times, we all need assignments. I remembered while growing up as a teenager, my brothers and I had assignments. Our father’s edict was if we wanted new sneakers, money for school events, shirts or pants, he had assignments waiting for us to complete. Some of our assignments included weeding with machetes (not mowing) our lawn; sweeping our yard, painting our picket fence, selling the local newspapers and bathing and grooming our pet dog, Rory. As I observe what’s currently occurring in our society, I noticed that our children have no assignments. Fathers and mothers are doing everything for their children and wondering why they (the children) are so ungrateful and lazy. I remembered a time when we (my childhood friends and I) all had assignments, because of those assignments our parents gave us money to attend the movies, one of our favorite pastimes. I believe this practice was called rewarding good behavior.

I am appalled when being around family and friends and observed how parents are begging children to obey their instructions. Sometimes, I wonder who is the child and who is the parent? Our children, especially boys, should have assignments, because without instructions the probability of bad or foolish behavior are unavoidable.

In the last frame of “Sing Your Song” Mr. Belafonte, an octogenarian, contemplates a life he could live with rich memories and luxury instead of the one he is “willing” living, which is stacked with assignments. He calmly said, “there is more work to do.” So, as I gratefully awake everyday with lots of assignments to complete, I will not complain instead I’ll remember Mr. Belafonte’s words, “there is more work to do.”

  • 11

    Oct

  • 0

By Ron Carter Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/The N-Word

The recent upheaval in the General Public Square regarding a presidential candidate’s insensitivity to the N-Word has caused a major deflation in his campaign. The issue revolved around the N-Word was painted on a stone at the entrance of this gentleman’s family hunting lodge. So, you can imagine the uproar once the mainstream media unfold the story. My frustration with the issue is some African-Americans excuse rappers and comedians who use the N-Word consistently in their art, but complain when other ethnicities utter the N-Word. Please, don’t inform me that when we call each other the N-Word it’s done in love and respect. That’s hogwash. The N-Word should be BANNED from our vocabulary. Are the individuals who use the N-Word in a profane manner aware how arduous our forefathers and mothers fought not to be called the N-Word? We must rebuke EVERYONE who uses the N-Word. And, please don’t inform me that it (the N-Word) adds punch to the rap or joke. That’s also hogwash.
Whenever I listen to Bill Cosby’s comedy and Will Smith’s (The Fresh Prince) rap, I am reminded one can effectively communicate spoken art without vulgarity. Both of these gentlemen are very successful entertainers sans the flippant use of the N-Word in their diction. Then, why are so many artists using the N-Word to convey their art? Why almost 100% of these artists are African-Americans? Why the race to the bottom? Why the silence regarding the denigration of the African-American culture? Come on people, we must speak up! We are calling each other vulgar names and laughing at the name calling. Have GREED and IRRESPONSIBILITY gotten so entrenched in our culture that we are no longer willing to speak up? Paul Mooney, a very talented and popular comedian who incessantly used the N-Word , pledged several months ago that he was going to eliminate the N-Word from his act. Are there other comedians who are willing to implement Paul Mooney’s  pronouncement?

I recently was offered the opportunity to represent a very talented rapper. I am certain this gentleman will be successful in his quest to become a major artist in the future. I chose not to represent him, because his lyrics were laced with profanity and the N-Word. There are public relations firms who will probably sign him as a client, but I didn’t, because in a deliberate manner I chose to do my part in not promoting the N-Word.