• 26

    Nov

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By Ron Carter Blog Post Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/By The Numbers

NCAA 2006 championship banners hang inside the...
NCAA 2006 championship banners hang inside the NCAA Hall of Champions in Indianapolis (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My colleague, attorney Everett Glenn, is continuing his mission to educate the public about the business of college sports. Everett is

president of the National Sports Authority and he has represented some of the biggest names in professional sports. Willie Gault, Jerry Rice, Richard Dent and Reggie White were some of Everett’s clients. If you are a National Football League (NFL) fan, you would know these gentlemen were some of the best athletes, who played in the NFL. Fast forward to the present and Everett is imparting knowledge to the public about the importance of knowing what is really taking place in the business of college sports. Without getting in the way of Everett’s remarks, below are some information he has researched and is sharing with the public:

By the numbers

 

  • 3.2% of the 546,000 Boys Who Participate in High School Basketball Receive an Athletic Scholarship
  • 6.1% of the 1,108.000 Boys Who Participate in High School Football Receive an Athletic  Scholarship
  • 57.2% of College Basketball Players are Black
  • 51.6% of College Football Players are Black
  • 65 % of Black College Basketball Players on 2013 NCAA Division 1 Basketball Tournament Teams Graduate; 90% of White Basketball Players on Those Teams  Graduate
  • 62% of Black College Football Players on the 2013 Bowl Bound Division 1 Football Teams Graduate; 82% of White Football Players Graduate
  • 0.03% of High School Basketball Players Go Pro
  • 1.2% of College Basketball Players Go Pro
  • 0.08% of High School Football Players Go Pro
  • 1.7% of College Football Players Go Pro
  • 2.8% of Full-Time, Degree-Seeking Undergrads Are Black Males
  • 51% of Black College Athletes (Basketball and Football) Fail to Graduate Within 6 Years;  60% of White College Athletes Graduate Within 6 Years
  • 1% – 38% is the Range of Disparity in Graduation Rates Between Black and White Student Athletes Across Individual Colleges and Universities Comprising the 6 Major

Conferences (ACC, Big East, Big-10, Big-12 Conference, Pac-12 Conference and SEC)

  • 96.1% of NCAA Division 1 Colleges Graduated Black Male Student-Athletes at Rates Lower Than Student Athletes Overall
  • 97.4% of Division 1 Colleges Graduated Black Male Student-Athletes at Rates Lower Than Undergraduate Students Overall
  • 64 Basketball Players are Drafted into NBA Each Year
  • 244 College Football Players are Drafted into the NFL Each Year
  • 75% of NBA Players are Black; 67% of NFL Players are Black
  • 4.81 Years is the Length of the Average NBA Career
  • 3.2 Years is the Length of the Average NFL Career
  • 80% of NFL Players are Bankrupt or Under Financial Distress Because of Joblessness or Divorce Within 3 Years of Retirement
  • 65% of NBA Players are Bankrupt or Under Financial Distress Because of Joblessness or Divorce Within 5 Years of Retirement

 Source of facts and figures:

[1] National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) study, last updated September 27, 2011.

[1] Id

[1] 2012 Racial and Gender Report Card: College Sports, the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports

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[1] Keeping Score Where It Counts:  Graduation Success and Academic Performance Rates for 2013 NCAA Division 1 Basketball Tournament Teams

[1] Keeping Score Where It Counts:  Assessing the 2012-13 Bowl-Bound College Football Teams’ Graduation Rates

[1] National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) study, last updated September 27, 2011.

[1] Harper, S.R., Williams, C.D., and Blackman, H.W. (2013): Black Male Student Athletes and Racial Inequities in NCAA Division 1 College Sports.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, Center for Race and Equity in Education

 

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March 23, 2009 edition of Sports Illustrated

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Check out the number of College Basketball and Footfall Players who are drafted into the professional leagues. There is an elephant in the room.

 

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  • 19

    Nov

  • 0

By Ron Carter Blog Post Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/Veto Hazing

Elephants In The RoomHopefully, The National Football League (NFL) will act to curb hazing, which is presently prevalent in its culture. I would recommend the NFL pay attention to the negative, fatal and financial, damages which hazing caused fraternities and sororities in the United States of America. These organizations have paid millions of dollars to victims in lawsuits, because their members were guilty of hazing.  Gone are the days when new recruits to organizations were subjected to some form of control hazing without the detrimental effect. Today, our culture is operating at a faster pace and thus the simple and sometimes degrading hazing practices of yesteryear are accelerated 100 times. This faster pace has predicated individuals to act with more aggression towards new recruits into their organizations. The present embarrassing hazing incident occurring in the NFL’s Miami Dolphins Locker Room is testament to my observation.
Instead of recruiting past players and teams’ executives to study the hazing issues in the NFL, the multi-billion dollars football industry should also consider speaking with individuals and institutions who have and still are battling the ignorance of out-of-control hazing. Individuals such as former college hazing victims, parents of hazing victims, college officials, fraternities and sororities presidents, judges, police officers and individuals who were accused of hazing which landed them in prison are appropriate candidates to assist the NFL

I am a fan of the NFL, but if American Football (NFL) will survive it must be prepared to honestly address its hazing culture. Hazing can be brutal, crude and degrading. It is time to eliminate hazing as a measure of if an individual qualifies to be a member of a group/team/fraternity/sorority et cetera, et cetera.

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  • 05

    Nov

  • 0

By Ron Carter Blog Post Updates

Curbing Bad Behavior/Visiting My Friend Andy Anderson

Andy Anderson & Ron CarterMy friend Andy Anderson, Vice President, Sales of American Urban Radio Network, invited me last night to a reception his company was hosting at JW Marriott, which is located at LA Live in downtown Los Angeles. Andy was in Los Angeles to attend the Association of National Advertisers Multicultural Marketing & Diversity Conference. It was great seeing Andy and definitively inspiring conversing with him. Commiserating with Andy reminded me why I chose – while in college – to major in communications. One of my college Communications professors discouraged me from pursuing a career in entertainment public relations. He told me it was too difficult a career to enter. After my graduation from college and subsequent work experiences at Gene Shelton & Associates, a public relations firm; Motown Records and Michael J Jackson Productions respectively, my professor called me and requested I speak to his Public Relations class about my career and the challenging journey I undertook, which culminated in me working in public relations for the “biggest star in entertainment” in the earlier 1990s’. After my presentation, my college professor apologized to me for his shortsightedness. Since that day, I have not allowed obstacles deter me from striving for my goals and objectives.
Observing Andy and his colleagues do their business is a testament to the power of communications, media and thus engagement. Andy introduced me to several individuals last night. I met and had informative conversations with marketing executives such as Ty Johnson, Vice President of Multicultural Sales & Development of Uplifting Entertainment and representative for Earvin “Magic” Johnson‘s Aspire; Nick F. Nelson, Chief Marketing Officer/Principal of Liquid Soul; Vida Cornelious, EVP, Chief Creative Officer of Globalhue; Al Ward, Vice President/National Sales Manager for KJLH Radio Station and my fraternity brother Christian Gonzalez, Chief Revenue Officer of Moguldom. Ty, who is an affable gentleman, secured four tickets from one of his ESPN colleagues and invited Andy and I to the Los Angeles Clippers‘ game (the Clippers were playing the Houston Rockets) across the street at Staples Center. I had an enjoyable time “hanging out” in VIP seats at the basketball game with the fellas.

I look forward to seeing Andy again soon when I visit New York. We both have enjoyed significant careers in the Media and Communications Industries. So, whenever we can share our achievements with each other, it’s a special moment. Andy, thanks for making last night special!

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